Igniting Innovation since 1989

Happy 30th Anniversary OMG

Happy 30th Anniversary, OMG!

Thirty years ago, eleven multi-national corporations sat down to create an international, open membership, not-for-profit technology standards consortium: the Object Management Group. The founders of OMG had the goal to standardize a common portable and interoperable object model with methods and data that work using all types of development environments on all types of platforms.

Lear more about where we've been, where we're going and what our members have to save about their experiences with us.


OMG through the years

OMG First PR
OMG First PR

What our members say

For various reasons depending on the company. First time was when I was at MITRE and we wanted to represent the interests of the US government. Another time was when I was at a pharmaceutical contracting startup and we wanted to create an open standard, but also to be the first to market with an implementation and gain a slight advantage. Sometimes it was on behalf of a consulting company. At Microsoft it's on behalf of a product company and we want to participate and drive some tools, maturity models, retail, IoT standards, etc. From a personal perspective, almost everything I have done in my career, from consulting, to standards, to publishing books, to strategy, to IoT and the IIC, has somehow been connected to OMG.

Ron Zahavi, Microsoft, Inc.

I got called from a business development guy (based on a book I just published) to come to a meeting and work on the Architecture-Driven Modernization Task Force (PSIG at the time). I showed up in Santa Clara (Dec. 2002), had breakfast with Andrew Watson (who gave me the low-down), was wooed by Djenana, joined, became ADM co-chair, and the rest is history.

William Ulrich, TSG, Inc.

In 1991-1994, the Semiconductor Equipment Manufacturers Association Technical Consortium (SEMATECH) had a joint project (CIMF) to standardize the interfaces among the process control systems, the equipment controllers, and the process information bases. Their 1993 specification was written in IDL and intended for CORBA implementation.

The mission of the Manufacturing Systems Integration Division at NIST was improving software integration in manufacturing and engineering, and we were a partner to the SEMATECH project, with the specific objective of making CIMF a formal national standard. The SEMATECH project chose OMG as the obvious body, and NIST joined OMG in 1993, as a Contributing Member, in order to forward that work. When the OMG domain technical committee was created in 1995, the NIST representative to SEMATECH and the OMG voting representative, the late Dr. Selden Stewart (my boss) and the SEMATECH representative (Fred Waskiewicz) were among the founding fathers of the Manufacturing DTF.

Ed Barkmeyer, Thematix Partners LLC

To support customer desires for products that I was working on.

Matt Wilson, SimVentions

I like the opportunity to interact with other experts in my field who are outside of my immediate circles to gain a broader understanding and to come to better solutions.  It’s also a good way to balance the highly practical with the more academic, and to try to influence the direction of technology adoption.

Matt Wilson, SimVentions

The community of highly skilled, knowledgeable and dedicated participants.

Fred Cummins, Agile Enterprise Design

The technical expertise of the contributors, and their willingness to work together, and especially on technologies that overlap multiple domains of work. (MfgDTF worked extensively with BMIDTF and Industrial Systems, and with Healthcare, ADPTF and ORBOS/MARS. Where else but OMG could you get all those folks in the same room, with an interest in working together?

On one Manufacturing topic that involves rare expertise – “configuration management” – I asked the expert from one contributor after his 2nd OMG meeting whether he thought the project was worthwhile. His response was: “Because of this project, I now know 3 other people who actually understand the problem -- <competitor representatives>. We agree on <certain things>, whether or not our organizations can agree to a standard.” In a similar vein, I introduced a human-resource management system vendor to a Healthcare expert who had just done a presentation on “certification”. He later said to me, “for our product, the 20-minute conversation with her paid for the OMG meeting.” The value of OMG goes way beyond “networking.”

Ed Barkmeyer, Thematix Partners LLC

The ability to collaborate with other experts and leverage each other’s knowledge. It’s a multiplier of people who have a common desire (not necessarily always in agreement) to work on standards that advance technology and openness. It’s also been a great place to network.

Ron Zahavi, Microsoft, Inc.

Many of the specs that I have worked on relate to achieving more open and interoperable Combat Management Systems. To that end I have had the privilege of working on and seeing many of these specs and resulting solutions developed.

Matt Wilson, SimVentions

I would have to say BPMN™, even though my involvement was only in BPMN v1. It is widely used, and extremely useful, in more fields than you can imagine. Manufacturing organizations use it for business activities, engineering activities, and manufacturing operations proper. But it is used in healthcare, finance, military operations, academic laboratories, and more, and it is supported by dozens of tools, in at least six languages. It stands alone as a means of getting committee agreement on detailed courses of action, but supporting tools can use the models to actually drive project tracking and/or project execution.

Ed Barkmeyer, Thematix Partners LLC

The Party Management specification. Beyond the fun name, it was a result of a great collaboration between people who I still consider friends. I recently heard that other specifications still make use of this specification, proving it is useful still 20 years later.

Ron Zahavi, Microsoft, Inc.

London 2003 – I met Cory on a bar hop and he told me that “all of the real OMG work gets done at night at the bar,” which I found to be useful advice. There were extracurricular activities at that meeting best left unstated but a prince from Sierra Leone thanked me for defending his country and bought me a beer.

William Ulrich, TSG, Inc.

The Japan meeting in the late 90’s when I was voted onto the AB, as well as going out with members to karaoke bars. All the meetings and dinners related to the AB. Also, in 1995 doing my first book signing. And of course, Object World conferences.

Ron Zahavi, Microsoft, Inc.

Relating to the OMG spec below, I worked on a specification that related to work that produced one of the first collaboration tools (similar to Skype) in the mid-late 90’s. I was also at OMG early on and worked on the first framework to be driven by end users (the US government) that sat on top of CORBA®. It led to the first book on CORBA which I co-authored. The framework was called DISCUS.

Ron Zahavi, Microsoft, Inc.

In 2013-4 at NIST, Ben Abeye, Peter Denno, and I worked on a practical application of the ISO 15926 standards, describing “product data sheets” for acquiring and maintaining production lines in chemical plants. Our models were in UML®, but we generated OWL and RDF outputs conforming to the generic ISO standards. (It is now possible to do that with products.) The “MDA” idea of generating implementation artifacts from purpose-built UML models is well-suited to a number of the au courant activities in “applied artificial intelligence.”

Ed Barkmeyer, Thematix Partners LLC

There are several technology areas that are relevant to my business as well as the personal and technical challenges I enjoy by remaining connected.

Matt Wilson, SimVentions

As I mentioned, practically everything I have done professionally has somehow been tied to or related to OMG (directly or sometimes indirectly). I like the collaboration, the open standards approach, the people, and lifelong friendships.

Ron Zahavi, Microsoft, Inc.

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